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Tips to Diversify Your Portfolio

On 05/12/2013, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

Diversification is crucial for long-term investment success.

Proper diversification, that is.

Today, how to better diversify your investment portfolio. 

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5 Common ETF Misconceptions

On 05/03/2013, in Exchange Traded Funds, by Jordan Wilson

I like exchange traded funds (ETFs) versus open-ended mutual funds for most individuals.

ETFs provide many advantages for investors, especially those with limited capital.

But there are also aspects of ETFs that require attention. 

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Portfolio Rebalancing Strategies

On 09/03/2012, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

Defining a target asset allocation is critical to investment success.

Equally important is ongoing portfolio monitoring and periodically rebalancing the actual asset allocation back to your target allocation.

The Wall Street Journal has a good article on strategies for rebalancing investment portfolios.

Worth reading in its entirety, buy I want to highlight a few points. 

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Investors Shun Risk

On 04/04/2012, in Investment Concepts, by Jordan Wilson

A relationship exists between investment risk and expected return.

The safer the asset, the lower the expected return. The greater the investment risk, the higher the required return. Or it can be a tad more technical if you like.

Investors should take an objective view of investment risk. Unfortunately, investors tend to be emotional creatures and these volatile times lead people to become fearful of investment risk.

So what is happening? And what should you do as an investor?

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Many readers are a long ways away from retirement.

Messing up on retirement is not yet on one’s radar.

But it should be.

And the sooner you realize how people mess up retirement, the easier it is to avoid problems. 

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Investing Philosophy in 10 Words

On 01/28/2012, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

Can you summarize your investment philosophy in 10 words or less?

Can anyone?

After all, investing is a complex subject. 

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Vanguard Investment Funds

On 12/03/2011, in Exchange Traded Funds, Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

I like Vanguard investment funds for long term individual investors.

Especially investors who follow a passive management style.

As I am not directly or indirectly compensated in any way by Vanguard I recommend them based solely on their merits.

That is not to say that other funds are poorer choices. I recommend a wide variety depending on a client’s investment objectives, desires, and available offering in their home jurisdiction. I believe in a “best of breed” approach for clients, not what is best for my revenue. And within the “best of breed” options, Vanguard funds pop up with regularity.

Why is this so?  

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There are two simple ways to rebalance your investment portfolio.

While these methods work best for investments in diversified assets such as mutual and exchange traded funds, they can also be employed for non-diversified assets as well.

Perhaps your target asset allocation is 70% U.S. equities and 30% U.S. bonds. Within the target allocation you have an acceptable absolute range of +/- 10%. After your latest portfolio review, you find that your actual asset allocation in 55% U.S. equities and 45% U.S. bonds.

You need to bring your portfolio back in line with your target allocation.

What do you do? 

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Thoughts on Portfolio Rebalancing

On 06/24/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

The goal of portfolio rebalancing is to bring your actual asset allocation back in line with your target allocation.

Your target allocation should be based on your Investment Policy Statement (IPS). This reflects your personal circumstances, investment objectives, constraints, risk tolerance, etc.

Who you are as an investor. 

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Investing in Partial Shares

On 06/13/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

The share price of certain companies or funds can become quite high over time.

That is one reason why many companies split their shares once they reach a certain value. To make the shares affordable to a wider range of investor.

For example, should you wish to acquire even one share of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (BRK-A) class A shares, you would require just under USD 112,000.00 as at June 13, 2011. A little too expensive for most individual investors.

And for smaller investors, even stocks like Google Inc. (GOOG) at about USD 505.00 or Apple Inc. (AAPL) at about USD 330.00 might be too dear for inclusion in a diversified portfolio.

So what does one do? 

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