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5 Common ETF Misconceptions

On 05/03/2013, in Exchange Traded Funds, by Jordan Wilson

I like exchange traded funds (ETFs) versus open-ended mutual funds for most individuals.

ETFs provide many advantages for investors, especially those with limited capital.

But there are also aspects of ETFs that require attention. 

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A Good Investor Always Saves

On 02/18/2013, in Investment Concepts, by Jordan Wilson

I am not a fan of Jim Cramer. Simply because he plays to the cameras. And I hate the theatrics.

But he talks about a time when he was doing poorly in life. And he makes a great point that should apply to all investors. So we shall give him a listen. 

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Top 10 Best Things About Mutual Funds

On 02/03/2012, in Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

Started reading Morningstar’s “Fund Spy” last night.

A gift from the nice folks at Morningstar, so thanks.

In it, Morningstar produces a chart with the top 10 best things about mutual funds.

An interesting list. 

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Vanguard Investment Funds

On 12/03/2011, in Exchange Traded Funds, Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

I like Vanguard investment funds for long term individual investors.

Especially investors who follow a passive management style.

As I am not directly or indirectly compensated in any way by Vanguard I recommend them based solely on their merits.

That is not to say that other funds are poorer choices. I recommend a wide variety depending on a client’s investment objectives, desires, and available offering in their home jurisdiction. I believe in a “best of breed” approach for clients, not what is best for my revenue. And within the “best of breed” options, Vanguard funds pop up with regularity.

Why is this so?  

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Fund Fees Barely Budge

On 10/31/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

I am a proponent of passive investing.

That means investing in passively managed index funds that track a specific market sector. Primarily, exchange traded (ETF) or open ended mutual index funds.

Research indicates that actively managed portfolios tend not to perform better than passive portfolios. And actively run portfolios cost investors more money in fees and expenses than passive.

So why take an active approach? 

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One perceived advantage of exchange traded funds (ETFs) over open-end mutual funds is their greater trading flexibility.

Many investors believe that there are also advantages in respect of ETF costs. Specifically, expense ratios, transaction costs, and tax efficiency.

As with trading flexibility, the potential advantages will vary between investors depending on their investing tactics. I will lay out the reality and you can decide if there is a benefit for you.

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Today we will start to look at the perceived advantages of exchange traded funds (ETFs) versus open-end index mutual funds.

Depending on the investor, some of these may be more important than others.

Or possibly these potential benefits may actually not entice an investors to choose ETFs over open-end index mutual funds. I write, you decide.

Let us begin with potential trading advantages.

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Exchange Traded Funds

On 11/10/2010, in Exchange Traded Funds, by Jordan Wilson

Another popular way to passively invest is through exchange traded funds.

Today we will discuss exchange traded funds and how they differ from similar investments.

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Open-End Index Mutual Funds

On 11/07/2010, in Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

Many investors passively invest using open-end index mutual and exchange traded funds.

Some investors lump the two instruments together when discussing passive holdings. And there are a lot of similarities when assessing for investment potential.

But there are also material differences between the two, so I shall discuss them separately.

Today we will take a very brief look at open-end index mutual funds.

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Investment Funds

On 08/20/2010, in Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

Investment funds are collective investment schemes.

That means that many investors aggregate their money in a single investment vehicle.

In theory, aggregation allows some or all of the following to individual investors: a simple way to create and maintain an investment portfolio; better portfolio diversification through asset classes and time; access to investments that cannot be bought by small investors; improved liquidity; fund management by investment professionals; economies of scales on expenses that reduce costs allocated to any one investor; consolidation of tax information.

Today we will review four types of investment funds.

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