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A Good Investor Always Saves

On 02/18/2013, in Investment Concepts, by Jordan Wilson

I am not a fan of Jim Cramer. Simply because he plays to the cameras. And I hate the theatrics.

But he talks about a time when he was doing poorly in life. And he makes a great point that should apply to all investors. So we shall give him a listen. 

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Benjamin Graham Investing Principles

On 03/14/2012, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

I mentioned Benjamin Graham in “Mistakes of Warren Buffett” and recommended his book, “The Intelligent Investor”.

Benjamin Graham mentored Warren Buffet and is considered the founder of value investing.

Today, a quick summary on Benjamin Graham and his three key principles for value investing. While they may not turn you into the next Warren Buffett, these investment tips will make you a better investor. 

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Buy and Hold Forever Stock Strategy

On 02/13/2012, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

Some financial advisors advocate a buy and hold forever strategy for individual stocks.

They cite such successful investors as Warren Buffett, Benjamin Graham, and John Templeton as staunch believers in a buy and hold forever approach.

Or financial experts tout articles like “The 7 Best Stocks for a Lifetime”.

As a good friend whose birthday is this week would put it, “Complete foolishness, I say.”

And she would be right. 

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Vanguard Investment Funds

On 12/03/2011, in Exchange Traded Funds, Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

I like Vanguard investment funds for long term individual investors.

Especially investors who follow a passive management style.

As I am not directly or indirectly compensated in any way by Vanguard I recommend them based solely on their merits.

That is not to say that other funds are poorer choices. I recommend a wide variety depending on a client’s investment objectives, desires, and available offering in their home jurisdiction. I believe in a “best of breed” approach for clients, not what is best for my revenue. And within the “best of breed” options, Vanguard funds pop up with regularity.

Why is this so?  

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Fund Fees Barely Budge

On 10/31/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

I am a proponent of passive investing.

That means investing in passively managed index funds that track a specific market sector. Primarily, exchange traded (ETF) or open ended mutual index funds.

Research indicates that actively managed portfolios tend not to perform better than passive portfolios. And actively run portfolios cost investors more money in fees and expenses than passive.

So why take an active approach? 

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Compare Performance to Peers

On 05/18/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

If you create a portfolio of individual stocks and bonds, it may be unique to you.

Creating a benchmark may take a little work.

If your invest in index funds, you will be able to easily find a relevant benchmark.

But I suggest you do not stop there in comparing your portfolio performance.

A great way to assess fund performance is to also compare results against the fund’s peers. 

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Buy and Hold with Individual Stocks

On 04/17/2011, in Investment Strategies, by Jordan Wilson

A long-term buy and hold strategy can work with individual, non-diversified assets. For example, shares of Cisco or Swiss Re. Or General Electric Capital bonds. Or the Japanese Yen.

But I would not recommend it.

Here is why. 

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One perceived advantage of exchange traded funds (ETFs) over open-end mutual funds is their greater trading flexibility.

Many investors believe that there are also advantages in respect of ETF costs. Specifically, expense ratios, transaction costs, and tax efficiency.

As with trading flexibility, the potential advantages will vary between investors depending on their investing tactics. I will lay out the reality and you can decide if there is a benefit for you.

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Open-End Index Mutual Funds

On 11/07/2010, in Mutual Funds, by Jordan Wilson

Many investors passively invest using open-end index mutual and exchange traded funds.

Some investors lump the two instruments together when discussing passive holdings. And there are a lot of similarities when assessing for investment potential.

But there are also material differences between the two, so I shall discuss them separately.

Today we will take a very brief look at open-end index mutual funds.

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A goal of passive investing is to match the market return as closely as possible.

However, it is not a given that a passively structured investment will match the market. In fact, there may be material variations between different investments and the benchmark index.

Index funds (both mutual and exchange traded) are typical passive investments. Here is why they do not normally match their benchmarks.

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